You are here:  Home  >  Tajweed Register   Login
 Add to Facebook
Minimize
 Page Links
Minimize
 What is Tajweed ?
Minimize

Tajweed

 
Tajweed is an Arabic word meaning proper pronunciation during quran recitation, as well as recitation at a moderate speed. It is a set of rules which govern how the quran should be read. It is derived from the trilateral root j-w-d, meaning to make well, make better, or improve. It is required by fard. There are seven schools of tajwid, the most popular school being the school of Hafs.
 
Rules of Tajweed
 

Manners of the heart

  • One should understand that the qur'an is not the word of man.

  • The reader should throw away all other thoughts.

  • One should understand the meaning.

  • One should be humble.

  • One should feel that every message in the koran is meant personally for himself or herself.

  • One should understand the proper pronunciation of Arabic alphabet.

External manners

  • One should be vigilant of the purity of body, clothes, and place.

  • One is encouraged to face the Qiblah.

  • One should stop at a verse of warning and seeking protection with Allah.

  • One should stop at a verse of mercy and asking Allah for mercy.

  • One should use pure classical Arabic pronunciation, without foreign or dialectic influence.

Emission points of the letters

The emission points of the letters, or Makharijul Huruf, is the study of where the sounds of the different letters are emitted from. There are 17 places, in various regions of the throat, tongue, lips, nose, as well as the mouth as a whole for the prolonged (Mudd) letters.

Characteristics of the letters

The characteristics of the letters, or Siffat al Huruf, refer to the different attributes of the letters. Some of the characteristics have opposites, while some are individual. An example of a characteristic would be the whistling (Safeer), which is an attribute sound of air escaping from a tube.

Rules of the letter NUN and tanween

The NUN sakinah and tanween (vowels that produces a "nnn" sound immediately after it) can be pronounced in four different ways: Clear (Idhar), Merged with the next letter (Idgham), Hidden (Ikhfa), and changed from a "nnn" sound to a "mmm" sound (Iqlaab).

Rules of the letter MIM

The MIM sakinah can be pronounced in three different ways, clear (Idhar), prolonged nasalization (Ghunnah), and uncloselipped (ikhfaa shafawee).

Rules of prolongation [muddud]

These rules refer to the number of beats that are pronounced when voweled letter is followed by a MUDD letter. The MUDD letters are Alif, Yaah, and Waw. The number of beats can range from 2 counts to 6 counts.

Rules of the letter LAM

The Arabic word for "the" is al- (the letters alif and lam). The lam in al- is pronounced if the letter after is "qamariyya" (lunar), but silent if the letter after is "shamsiyya" (solar).

Thickness and Thinness of the letters

Some of the arabic letters are always pronounced thick with a heavy accent (Tafkhim). Some letters are pronounced thin with a light accent (Tarqeeq). The first category of letters are called "mufakham" the lattaer "muraqqaq". Some letters depend on the scenario, and are sometimes pronounced thick, and sometimes thin.

 
 
How can you learn tajweed?
 

Tajweed and its application can only be learned with a qualified teacher.

The rules themselves can be studied independently, but their correct application can only be done by listening to, reciting to, and being corrected by, a qualified teacher of the Qur'an.
 

Do all Arabs know how to recite the Qur'an with proper tajweed?

Unfortunately many do not know proper tajweed.  In the days of the Prophet, peace and blessing upon him, there was no need for the study of tajweed because they talked with what is now known as tajweed; in other words, it was natural for them.  Now, over 14 centuries later, colloquial Arabic has changed radically from the classical Arabic with which the Qur'an was revealed, and Arabs have to study tajweed, just in the same way that non-Arabs do.
 

I want to learn to recite the Qur'an with proper tajweed, but don't know where to start.

The first step is finding a qualified Qur'an teacher who will listen to you and point out your mistakes, and help you practice fixing them.  You will need to learn the Arabic letters and vowels too.
 

What if there aren't any qualified teachers where I live?

Then your task is going to be a little harder, but certainly not impossible.  You need to work with tapes of good reciters, for example, Sheikh Abdullah Basfar, or Sheikh Mohammed Hosary.  There are sets available on the Internet and in Islamic stores that are called "mu'alm".  In these sets, the reciter reads a phrase, and then there is a blank space on the tape, allowing the student to repeat what the reciter has just read.

 
 
 

Tajweed

 
Tajweed is an Arabic word meaning proper pronunciation during quran recitation, as well as recitation at a moderate speed. It is a set of rules which govern how the quran should be read. It is derived from the trilateral root j-w-d, meaning to make well, make better, or improve. It is required by fard. There are seven schools of tajwid, the most popular school being the school of Hafs.
 
Rules of Tajweed
 

Manners of the heart

  • One should understand that the qur'an is not the word of man.

  • The reader should throw away all other thoughts.

  • One should understand the meaning.

  • One should be humble.

  • One should feel that every message in the koran is meant personally for himself or herself.

  • One should understand the proper pronunciation of Arabic alphabet.

External manners

  • One should be vigilant of the purity of body, clothes, and place.

  • One is encouraged to face the Qiblah.

  • One should stop at a verse of warning and seeking protection with Allah.

  • One should stop at a verse of mercy and asking Allah for mercy.

  • One should use pure classical Arabic pronunciation, without foreign or dialectic influence.

Emission points of the letters

The emission points of the letters, or Makharijul Huruf, is the study of where the sounds of the different letters are emitted from. There are 17 places, in various regions of the throat, tongue, lips, nose, as well as the mouth as a whole for the prolonged (Mudd) letters.

Characteristics of the letters

The characteristics of the letters, or Siffat al Huruf, refer to the different attributes of the letters. Some of the characteristics have opposites, while some are individual. An example of a characteristic would be the whistling (Safeer), which is an attribute sound of air escaping from a tube.

Rules of the letter NUN and tanween

The NUN sakinah and tanween (vowels that produces a "nnn" sound immediately after it) can be pronounced in four different ways: Clear (Idhar), Merged with the next letter (Idgham), Hidden (Ikhfa), and changed from a "nnn" sound to a "mmm" sound (Iqlaab).

Rules of the letter MIM

The MIM sakinah can be pronounced in three different ways, clear (Idhar), prolonged nasalization (Ghunnah), and uncloselipped (ikhfaa shafawee).

Rules of prolongation [muddud]

These rules refer to the number of beats that are pronounced when voweled letter is followed by a MUDD letter. The MUDD letters are Alif, Yaah, and Waw. The number of beats can range from 2 counts to 6 counts.

Rules of the letter LAM

The Arabic word for "the" is al- (the letters alif and lam). The lam in al- is pronounced if the letter after is "qamariyya" (lunar), but silent if the letter after is "shamsiyya" (solar).

Thickness and Thinness of the letters

Some of the arabic letters are always pronounced thick with a heavy accent (Tafkhim). Some letters are pronounced thin with a light accent (Tarqeeq). The first category of letters are called "mufakham" the lattaer "muraqqaq". Some letters depend on the scenario, and are sometimes pronounced thick, and sometimes thin.

 
 
How can you learn tajweed?
 

Tajweed and its application can only be learned with a qualified teacher.

The rules themselves can be studied independently, but their correct application can only be done by listening to, reciting to, and being corrected by, a qualified teacher of the Qur'an.
 

Do all Arabs know how to recite the Qur'an with proper tajweed?

Unfortunately many do not know proper tajweed.  In the days of the Prophet, peace and blessing upon him, there was no need for the study of tajweed because they talked with what is now known as tajweed; in other words, it was natural for them.  Now, over 14 centuries later, colloquial Arabic has changed radically from the classical Arabic with which the Qur'an was revealed, and Arabs have to study tajweed, just in the same way that non-Arabs do.
 

I want to learn to recite the Qur'an with proper tajweed, but don't know where to start.

The first step is finding a qualified Qur'an teacher who will listen to you and point out your mistakes, and help you practice fixing them.  You will need to learn the Arabic letters and vowels too.
 

What if there aren't any qualified teachers where I live?

Then your task is going to be a little harder, but certainly not impossible.  You need to work with tapes of good reciters, for example, Sheikh Abdullah Basfar, or Sheikh Mohammed Hosary.  There are sets available on the Internet and in Islamic stores that are called "mu'alm".  In these sets, the reciter reads a phrase, and then there is a blank space on the tape, allowing the student to repeat what the reciter has just read.

 
 
 
 Tracking banner حسبنا الله و نعم الوكيل
Minimize
Copyright 2009 by Learn Quran For Kids   |  Privacy Statement  |  Terms Of Use     Alhamdulillah (الحمد لله)